Sechelt Land Transfer Agreement

The Indian Act remains the most common legal regime applicable to British Columbia`s reserve countries. Reserve countries managed under the Indian Act can be divided into « Locatee Lands » or « Band Lands ». The distinction between these two categories of countries continues in one way or another under each of the other more autonomous regimes. It is therefore useful to be aware of this distinction under the Indian Act. (d) to receive and use all funds acquired by or on behalf of the First Nation under its federal law. When I use the term « First Nation Country » in this document, I am referring to « lands reserved for Indians » within the meaning of the Constitution Act of 1867 (« Reserve Lands »), which fall under the exclusive jurisdiction of the Parliament of Canada, and to lands transferred to First Nations for payment under treaties over which First Nations are jurisdictional. The latter category does not cover reserve countries. The FNLMA regime recognizes all rights and interests existing in reserve countries at the time of entry into force of a functional law, including the rights and special interests of settlements in their country. [7] (b) grant interests or rights to that country and licenses in respect of that country; Unlike the Nisga`a Final Agreement, TFN`s Final Agreement requires that TFN`s simple interests acquired in the Tsawwassen countries and other Tsawwassen countries, including all subordinated interests such as the TFSI, be registered as provincially on the day the contract comes into effect. [30] Three modern contracts are currently in effect in British Columbia. The Nisga`a Final Agreement, British Columbia`s first modern land claims agreement, came into force on May 11, 2000. The Tsawwassen First Nation Final Agreement came into effect nine years later, on April 3, 2009.

The Maa-Nulth First Nations Final Agreement came into effect on April 1, 2011. Under the Nisga`a Agreement, the Nisga`a Nation acquired simple ownership of two categories of land defined by the Nisga`a Agreement as « Nisga`a Lands » and « Nisga`a Fee Simple Lands ». J-D Murray, a Vancouver-based NAI Commercial executive who negotiated the sale with his NAI agent Gary Haukeland and Chris Moore, president of Crosby Moore Real Estate, listed the property at $13.98 million as part of the client`s sale order. Some of the land that will be transferred to shíshálh Nation as part of last year`s founding agreement with the province could be transferred as early as next summer. Shíshálh chief Warren Paull said the 396.9-hectare land was « too good to abandon, » given that the municipality needs land for housing construction and the land has three water licenses that can support a fish hatchery. As a simple country, the SCRD zoning rules would continue to apply, unless shíshálh Nation had taken steps to rename them bandland, in which case the federal rules would come into effect. . . .